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Innovation in chess thinking.
Analyze position with hazardous elements.


A new technique for analyzing positions at the interface of strategy and tactics will considerably improve your playing and prevent you from making blunders.

Downoad book in PDF format: https://neoneuro.com/downloads/chuzhakinssystem.pdf

Download book in ChessBase CBV format: https://neoneuro.com/downloads/chuzhakinsystem_en.cbv

Chuzhakin’s system will:

  • improve your positional play
  • decrease the number of blunders, especially combination oversights
  • make your play more confident and let you use your time rationally because you will not have to pay attention to unnecessary points on the board
  • specify when it is necessary to calculate tactical variants and when you can do without it
  • help you find unexpected combinations owing to an effective and simple algorithm
  • suggest a correct arrangement of pieces to create tactical threats for your opponent
  • make it easier to find a defense in a complicated position
  • reduce the number of variants you have to calculate when analyzing a position and choosing a move.

You can find general information about the system in the review; there are also introduction chapters available.

The concept of hazardous elements (HE) is the most important in the system. Hazardous elements show you the key points on the chessboard where combinations can be performed. An important advantage of the hazardous element theory is its completeness – ALL combinations and tactical motives that can be in practice are directly connected with hazardous elements.

Hazardous elements are not always a real threat. They are only a “weather cock” which shows from what quarter the wind of tactics can blow. There are a lot of rules for calculation of hazardous elements. This can be a challenge in the beginning, but you have to accept it, because this tactical play is very complicated and diverse and it is quite difficult to use a smaller number of rules.

 

Examples

In the Grand Slam final in Bilbao 2012 the game Carlsen vs Karjakin resulted in the following position:

was 1.Rd5? Rd8?, with the rook exchange and a worse position for Black. Neither Carlsen nor Karjakin noticed a beautiful combination which means it is very complicated to search for tactics in practice. As we can see the system gives clear directions when and where you can search for tactical strikes and which techniques you should use – in this case the techniques include deflection and destruction of defending objects and catching a piece that has limited mobility.

Many hazardous elements in this example were not important in the variants. E.g. these are Black’s HE a7, b8, g6, g7. So you can ask why you should take them into account.

This is because HE should be calculated according to the rules and we have to calculate them, otherwise the system makes no sense. On the other hand, many HE are concealed tactical bombs which can explode after some changes in a position are made. That’s why you always have to monitor them. Moreover, sometimes at first glance a hazardous element seems to be of no importance but it can be crucial when calculating certain variants.

Let’s examine an example from a game of a reader.

Nmbers of rules are written in brackets.

Black’s hazardous elements: a7(3), b7(3), d7(3, point d7 is attacked twice, as the attack through the friendly bishop on d3 is counted according to the system), d8(3), e7(3), g8(7.1), h7(4). White wins by making consecutive attacks on all 7 HE of Black. The hazardous element theory allows you to find correct moves in this position almost automatically:

 

Below is my game versus Genius on mobile Phone, the level of PC is not high, just one secund per move, I also played fast.

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Categories: Chess

mariozevich · June 18, 2014 at 10:27 pm

pages 67 and 68 of the book review in russian…????…could you include them in english?…..regards

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Evgeny Chuzhakin · July 24, 2014 at 4:34 am

The book is initially written in Russian and the most important chapters are translated to English. Chapter 9. Capablanca’s Style (pages 67, 68) is translated completely now. New version is: http://www.neoneuro.com/downloads/chuzhakinssystem.pdf
Please write here the questions about the System or use a facebook page.

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righen · September 28, 2014 at 11:22 pm

[quote name=”Evgeny Chuzhakin”]The book is initially written in Russian and the most important chapters are translated to English. Chapter 9. Capablanca’s Style (pages 67, 68) is translated completely now. New version is: http://www.neoneuro.com/downloads/chuzhakinssystem.pdf
Please write here the questions about the System or use a facebook page.[/quote]

Hi,

First of all your system is great.
I try the part of the system at chesstempo.com and my result has greatly improved.
But I am having problem in 3 elements:

possibility of an attack
intrusion squares
Intruding enemy pieces

Can you explain to me how those 3 elements work?

I also have another question:

do i have to recalculate the HE’s after every move in my calculation of variations?

thanks in advance

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Evgeny Chuzhain · September 30, 2014 at 12:31 pm

[quote name=”righen”]
possibility of an attack
intrusion squares
Intruding enemy pieces

Can you explain to me how those 3 elements work?
[/quote]
Examples are provided in the book in Chapter 4. If these examples are not clear or you have problem when understanding them or other positions – please, le me know.
I also have another question:

[quote name=”righen”]
do i have to recalculate the HE’s after every move in my calculation of variations?
[/quote]
Not always, please see Chapter 8. Move Calculation Algorithm.
quote:
7. If the move we plan to make can cause forced operations, e.g. exchange or any variant which can change the situation on the board fundamentally, it is desirable that you calculate hazardous elements in the positions which will appear after the forced variants.

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geller · December 9, 2014 at 10:59 am

How does one count for example. Being down a knight and a pawn, or three pawns, is the harzard created by a knight equal or more than a pawn? And if iv lost 3 pawns, are each counted as one HE or 3 HE. Is initiative(tempo) incorporated into the system? A very nice book

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Aox · July 17, 2015 at 8:21 am

Hi,
i have some questions about the paper : http://www.neoneuro.com/downloads/chuzhakinssystem.pdf

He #9:
Page 69 Game Adams-Carlsen after move 22 you have f2 as He #9 but this square is defended 3 times ( Kg1,Rf1,Be3 ) and it is attacked only 1 time ( Rf8 ). So why is it a HE?
Same question Page 22 Dominguez-So there h8 is defended twice ( k+b ) and attacked only once. Why is it a HE?

HE #2 and HE #3
As far as i understand HE#2 is just a special case of HE#3 ?

HE#4
Page 69 Adams-Carlsen after move 13. c3 is marked as HE#3 AND HE#4; after move 17. e4 is marked as HE#3 and HE#4.
I think most HE#3 will be HE#4 too so HE#4 “should” be only exchanges where the number of defender is bigger that the number of attacker?

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Evgeny Chuzhakin · October 1, 2015 at 10:25 am

[quote name=”geller”]How does one count for example. Being down a knight and a pawn, or three pawns, is the harzard created by a knight equal or more than a pawn?[/quote]
In Chapter 5. Notation of Hazardous Elements you can find a table with APPROXIMATE hierarchy of hazard. It shows what HE have influence on the result of the game [b]statistically [/b]more often.
[quote name=”geller”]
And if iv lost 3 pawns, are each counted as one HE or 3 HE.
[/quote]
One HE #1
[quote name=”geller”]
Is initiative(tempo) incorporated into the system?
[/quote]
Yes, this is the internal sense of the System.
[quote name=”geller”]
A very nice book
[/quote]
Thank you!

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Evgeny Chuzhakin · October 1, 2015 at 12:28 pm

Hi Aox,
1. He #9
[quote name=”Aox”]Hi,
He #9:
Page 69 Game Adams-Carlsen after move 22 you have f2 as He #9 but this square is defended 3 times ( Kg1,Rf1,Be3 ) and it is attacked only 1 time ( Rf8 ). So why is it a HE?
[/quote]
This is because F2 is near the King.
The reason is described in HE #9 in examples:
“Black’s intrusion squares are a6, b7, d7 and d8 – the squares under attack near the king are hazardous elements even if the number of defenses exceeds the number of attacks.”
[quote name=”Aox”]
HE #2 and HE #3
As far as i understand HE#2 is just a special case of HE#3 ?
[/quote]
Yes. He#2 is [b]crucial[/b] and it is used by other methods.

[quote name=”Aox”]
HE#4
HE#4 “should” be only exchanges where the number of defender is bigger that the number of attacker?[/quote]
If we say this, it will not be a problem. But HE #3 in most cases does not allow to capture an object on the next move, while HE #4 always allows capture.

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albon · June 2, 2016 at 7:44 pm

Can you explain more what is the definition of “_-hazardous objects”?
It is not clear.
If I say “Knight-hazardous rooks” do you mean that the rook can be attacked by knights? and if so way do you say that the knights should be in a1 or f1 (your first example)?

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Chuzhakin · June 3, 2016 at 7:53 am

[quote name=”albon”]
If I say “Knight-hazardous rooks” do you mean that the rooks can be attacked by knight?
[/quote]
It means that there is a square from which both rooks could be attacked by knight – independently of current knight position.

Examples: white rooks on a1 and c1 are in knight-hazardous. Black knight can attack them from b3. Rooks on a1 and d1 are not knight-hazardous (and they are on different colors, which can be used for fast placing pieces to not knight-hazardous positions).

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alhedhed · December 23, 2016 at 8:11 pm

i just want to thank you
and hope you are fine
and wish you provide analysis to new games or lessons at
https://ar.lichess.org/study
thanks

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Bobby Dan · January 16, 2017 at 2:05 pm

Great effort appreciated. I found the following errors which may help in correction.
Page 34. Karpovs Queen can be placed on d2 initially. Because the problem says white to play. After wasting time we realise that White played Blunder move.
Pg.38 Danielson-Please mark Black to play
Pg 49 -Tomzack-It is White to play
Page 50-Adams-White to play…….Black to play
Also I feel you should use the chess terminology FILE instead of LINE.

Thanks for this wonderful system

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